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The Best

Bass Amp Heads

Handpicked
Quality-Checked
On Sale Now!Bestseller No. 1
TC Electronic Bass Amplifier Head (BAM200)
  • 200 Watt portable micro bass head amplifier for stage and studio
  • Ultra-compact and lightweight design for ultimate portability
  • Cutting-edge Class-D amplifier technology for incredible power and sonic performance
  • TC Electronic Preamplifier design for authentic sound and feel of a tube amp
Bestseller No. 2
Genzler Magellan Bass Amp Head - Two Chan Pre, 400W/8 ohm, 800W/4ohm/2.67ohm
  • Clean Channel – Pristine and Articulate
  • Drive Channel – Voiced for a More Driven Tonal Signature and Harmonic Texture
  • Dual-Curve Variable Contour Circuitry || Curve A -- Classic to Modern -- Mid Scoop Curve || Curve B -- Thicker to Vintage -- Low-Mid Bump w/Tapered Top End
  • Active 3 Band EQ w/Parametric Mid Control
Bestseller No. 3
BEHRINGER BXD3000H Ultra-Lightweight 300-Watt 2-Channel Bass Amplifier Head with FBQ...
  • Ultra-compact 300-Watt 2-channel bass amplifier
  • Revolutionary Class-D amplifier technology: enormous power, incredible sonic performance and ultra-lightweight
  • Clean channel with dedicated Gain control
  • Distortion channel with dedicated Gain, Shape and Level controls
Bestseller No. 4
Ampeg PF-500 Bass Amplifier Head
  • RMS power output: 500W @ 4 ohms
  • Preamp: MOSFET, Power amp: Class D
  • Tone controls: Bass, mid, treble; Mid-tone control: 5-position; Ultra Hi/Lo boosts
  • Onboard Limiter
Bestseller No. 5
Gallien-Krueger Legacy 800-800-Watt Ultra Light Bass Head
  • 800W Compact Bass Amp Head with Class D Power Amp
  • Analog Preamp with Overdrive

Buyer's Guide: Bass Amp Heads

Things to Consider When Choosing a Bass Amplifier Head

A bass amp head (sometimes called a headset) is the component of a full-range electric bass amplifier that amplifies your acoustic guitar's electrical signal so that it can be heard over other instruments in a band. It consists of the main electrical components of an amplifier, which includes a power amplifier, a preamp, and a mid-frequency equalizer. It is often used as a conditioning or equalizer pedal for the unit's trigger output. There are three different types of head units: power-level (SXS), variable capacitor (VCF), and limit switch (LSF).

The most common bass amp head is the one that comes with a pair of speakers. This is ideal if you play mostly acoustic music or if you are looking to use a passive crossover for your electric guitar. For most people, however, they need something more powerful to handle the amount of bass their instrument will generate. If you do not have much money to spend on a new bass amp head, then a good choice is a quality aftermarket head unit.

As opposed to bass amps, bass cabinets, or towers, are used for amplifying sound effects and drum samples. They have much longer cords than amps because their main purpose is to accommodate a mixer, sound module, or input and output devices. You can use a variety of different cabinet models, which include floor-standing, wall-mounted, or cabinet/subwoofer combos. Some bass amp heads require you to connect the cabinet to your amplifier.

If you are building a live band and need to run all your equipment through a single amplifier, then a bass amp head is exactly what you need. There are several different types of bass amp heads, including solid-state or switching, envelope, or hybrid. You can use one type of head, or mix and match. A solid-state bass amplifier head runs a single electrical motor all the way through the amplifier so that the signal is always sent from the amp directly.

A combo amp is basically a set of speakers with a preamp built into them. This preamp allows you to operate your regular speakers as well as your subwoofers through the single amp. Many combo amps allow you to plug in your iPod or other devices through the same speakers that handle the sound. This allows you to hear all your equipment through one box.

Some solid-state amps even have a built-in compressor for additional sound effects. On the other hand, a tube amplifier utilizes the speaker's tube to create the music. Although tube amps give a more pure tone, they also tend to be much larger and are less efficient than solid-state. If you are looking for the most effective tonal balance, then solid-state tubes are the best option.

Another thing to consider is the enclosure of the speaker. Since tweeters and basses produce loud sounds at times, their enclosure should be made of durable materials like heavy gauge steel or aluminum to prevent feedback, which can damage speakers and affect the sound quality. Tweeters and basses with poor cones will also produce a different sound compared to speakers with better cones. Tweeters are normally placed in the front of the vehicle because it has the best realism when compared to subwoofers.

Cabinet designs also affect the sound a speaker produces. Most compact units use a sealed cabinet so that there is no chance of sound waves escaping from the box. If you need something that is big enough and powerful sounding, then a full range of amplifiers is perfect for you. But if you want to be frugal and choose smaller and cheaper cabinets, then you can opt for simpler amplifiers.